cranial musculature and taxonomy of characoid fishes of the tribes Cynodontini and Characini
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cranial musculature and taxonomy of characoid fishes of the tribes Cynodontini and Characini by Gordon Howes

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Published by British Museum in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Characidae.,
  • Skull.,
  • Muscles.,
  • Fishes -- Anatomy.,
  • Fishes -- Classification.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 245-248.

StatementGordon Jon Howes.
SeriesBulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) Zoology ; v. 29, no. 4
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQL1 .B75 vol. 29, no. 4, QL638.C5 .B75 vol. 29, no. 4
The Physical Object
Paginationp. 201-248 :
Number of Pages248
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4952785M
LC Control Number76381006

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The cranial musculature and taxonomy of the characoid fishes of the tribes Cynodontini and Characini HOWES, G. J. The anatomy, phylogeny and classification of bariliine cyprinid fishes. For most fishes cranial elevation is likely not achieved by flexion at the craniovertebral joint alone, and the center of cranial rotation is further posterior at approximately the level of the.   The cranial musculature and taxonomy of characoid fishes of the tribes Cynodontini and Characini Howes, Howes The anatomy and relationships of the cyprinid fish Luciobrama macrocephalus (Lacepède). The second distinction of the fantail from other fish, including the carp Cyprinus carpio of the same family Cyprinidae, is the absence of some muscles of the upper parts of the gill arches, such.

G.J. HowesThe cranial musculature and taxonomy of characoid fishes of the tribes Cynodontini and Characini Bull. Br. Mus. Nat. Hist. (Zool.), 29 (), pp. Google ScholarCited by:   The skulls and cranial muscles of the primitive characins Creatochanes and Brycon are described. Other Characinoidei, which have been selected to illustrate the remarkable adaptive radiation of the suborder, are compared with them in by: validity in fish stock unit identification. Figure 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS dorsal fin heFish sample adipose base (AdB), 1 A total of specimens of the three Chrysichthys species were collected in February from the fish farm of Jacqueville in the Ebrié lagoon: 5°15’ to 5°20’N and 4’25’ to 4°30’W (Figure 1).Author: Tionrotia Alice, Sita Ouattara, Koffi Mexmin Konan, Kouadio Justin Konan, Abouo Béatrice, Boua Céles. Full text of "Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History)" See other formats.

  The cranial musculature and taxonomy of the characoid fishes of the tribes Cynodontini and Characini Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History), Zoology 29Cited by: HOWES, G.J. The cranial musculature and taxonomy of characoid fishes of the tribes Cynodontini and Characini. Bull Br Mus (Nat Hist). Zool. [ Links ] HUGUENY, B. & POUILLY, M. Morphological correlates of diet in an assemblage of West African freshwater fishes. J Fish Biol. 54(6) [ Links ] HYNES, H.B.N. Author: Diogo Campos Cardoso, Pieter deHart, Carlos Edwar de Carvalho Freitas, Flávia Kelly Siqueira-Souza. G.J. HowesThe cranial musculature and taxonomy of characoid fishes of the tribes Cynodontini and Characini Bull. Br. Zool. Mus. (Nat. Hist.), 23 (), pp. Google ScholarCited by: The order Characiformes includes a vast array of fishes that live in rivers and lakes of Africa and the New World (from Texas in North America through Central and South America). They are divided into 14 or 16 families (Géry, , and Greenwood et al., , respectively), four of which are African (over species), and the rest live mostly in the Neotropics (more than 1, species).